Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

How Volunteering Helps Your Mental and Physical Health

How Volunteering Helps Your Mental and Physical Health

When you volunteer, you get the satisfaction of knowing you helped someone out, even if only for a day. However, did you know volunteering also helps yourself? Studies have found that volunteering can positively impact both your body and your mind. We’re here to tell you all about the different ways doing good in your community can do some good for yourself.

Volunteering helps you stay physically and mentally active.
Many volunteer opportunities require you to be on your feet, which according to researchers, causes many volunteers to report better physical health than their non-volunteering counterparts, especially in those over 60 years of age. When you volunteer, you’re moving and thinking at the same time, stimulating your brain and keeping your mental health in shape. Some volunteers even report higher levels of life satisfaction.

Volunteering decreases your risk of depression.
Continuously volunteering increases your social interactions and gives you a support system of those with common interests. These factors are proven to lead to lower rates of depression, particularly for those 65 years and older. 

Volunteering can help you live longer.
Researchers have found that those who volunteer have lower rates of mortality than non-volunteers, even when factoring in gender, age and physical health. Volunteers with chronic or serious illnesses also have reported decreased pain intensity and depression when they help others in pain. 

Volunteering allows you to form meaningful relationships.
Meeting new people while volunteering is often many people’s favorite aspects of it. Whether it’s someone you served or a fellow volunteer, donating your time is a great way to expand your social network. You can also volunteer with those you know to strengthen existing relationships. Social skills and friendships are essential to positive mental health. 

Volunteering can reduce stress levels.
When you volunteer, you often feel a sense of purpose and appreciation. It can come from yourself, as well as from those whom you serve. This feeling of meaning has the ability to reduce your stress levels. The social relationships you form while volunteering can also alleviate feelings of stress and anxiety.

Volunteering can improve your confidence.
As you continue to volunteer consistently, you become more sure of yourself in your role. For example, if you regularly volunteer at your local nursing home, you know what you’re doing and how to best help each individual. This self-assurance can translate into your daily life. You become more comfortable speaking to new people and dealing with conflict. Confidence is key to good mental health, so if you feel it’s something you should work on, try volunteering. 

Volunteering is a great way to improve your community, as well as your body and mind. If you’re looking to do some good in more ways than one, check out volunteering opportunities in a field that interests you.

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