Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

How to Set (and Accomplish) Life Goals

How to Set (and Accomplish) Life Goals

We all have goals in life. Whether they’re professional, personal or physical, our goals push us toward our larger purposes in life. They give us targets to aim for, and when we accomplish them, we can look on to the next target, as we keep moving forward toward our ultimate mission in life. Of course, none of this is possible if we don’t actually accomplish our life goals.

Setting goals is simple. We’ve all heard different phrases, acronyms and ways to properly set a goal for life. However, accomplishing goals can be a whole different task. Particularly for those who choose to live an altruistic lifestyle, accomplishing your goals is an intricate part of not only improving your own life, but helping to support others throughout their lives, as well. Today we dive in to how you can set (and actually accomplish) life goals.

1. Set goals which motivate you.
The first step in setting appropriate life goals is choosing goals which actually motivate and inspire you toward action. If you’re not passionate from the very beginning of a goal, then you definitely will not be passionate during the tough, nitty-gritty ending. You must care about the outcome of a goal before ever applying it to your life. Start out by choosing a few goals which apply to the high priorities in your life. For instance, if your personal goal is to impact someone in need, an example goal could be to join a child mentoring program. When your goals are inherently motivating, they continually inspire you to accomplish them.

2. Choose SMART goals.
Once you have motivational goals in mind, it’s time to actually piece them together. Here’s where the SMART technique comes in. SMART represents goals which are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time Bound. Your goal should first be clear and well-defined. It should also be easily measurable. For example, instead of “lose weight,” a measurable goal would be “lose 10 pounds.” Be sure your goal is actually attainable. If your goal is too big or downright impossible, it’s going to be difficult to keep your motivation up as you strive to complete it. Goals should be relevant to the general direction you want to take in life. Finally, they should be time bound with a deadline. Not only does this give you a sense of urgency, but it also clearly defines whether you accomplish your goal or not.

3. Write your goals down.
When your SMART goals are ready to go, take time to physically write them down. The act of writing makes your goals real and tangible, rather than some far-off thought. Use action-oriented language, such as, “I will,” rather than “I would like to.” When your goals are written down, put them somewhere you can see them every day, such as by your work desk or on your bathroom mirror. This will continually remind you of your goals and encourage you to keep going as you strive to accomplish them.

4. Make a plan and stick to it.
Finally—and here comes the important part—if you want to accomplish your goals, make a plan and stick to it. Create mini-goals along the way which will help you on the path of your larger goal. Celebrate small victories, and when you make mistakes, don’t stay down for long. Oftentimes, when people mess up on the path to accomplish their goals, they feel defeated, when in fact it is the perfect time to keep moving forward. If you miss a step toward accomplishing your goal, realign your path and try again tomorrow. The important thing is to stick to the plan even in the smallest circumstances, and you will ultimately accomplish your goals.

If you strive to live an altruistic life, goal setting is an important component. When we set goals throughout every aspect of our lives, we naturally move ourselves closer to our final purpose and mission. By using these steps for goal setting and sticking to your plan, you can set—and achieve—any goals you put your mind to.

  • Area Catholic choirs will perform Advent and Christmas songs of the season in the beautiful setting of St. Thomas Aquinas Church (the Newman Center) on the campus of UNL. Visit our calendar of event page for more information and to print out a ticket order form.

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