Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The cause of breast cancer has gained a lot of exposure and awareness in recent years, especially thanks to the National Football League. You may have noticed the touches of pink on NFL players’ uniforms this month, as October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. According to Komen.org, “In 2012, breast cancer accounted for nearly 25% of all cancers.” Here are a few tips from Komen.org to help you diagnose breast cancer or help someone going through the experience:

What is Breast Cancer?
Breast cancer is the result of malfunctioning cells and there is an increase in cell growth and not cell death. The balance between cell growth and cell death is crucial to organ systems. The result of this growth is a malignant tumor, meaning cancer.

Mammography Screening
Regular mammography screening is important in early detection. If there is a family history of breast cancer, screenings are recommended to start as early as in your twenties. Not all breast cancers are diagnosed through mammography, so self-evaluation is crucial. Visit Komen.org for the most common symptoms.

Social Support
If someone you love is diagnosed with breast cancer, it is important to provide social support through their wide range of emotions. Your loved one will experience shock, fear, sadness and anger. Time may ease these emotions, but your support will be crucial. Social support reduces anxiety, depression, fatigue and many other emotional symptoms of cancer.

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