Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Questions to Ask When Volunteering as a Family

What’s the first step in volunteering as a family? Get your family on board, of course. Have a positive attitude going into the process to show your kids that volunteering and giving back to your community is fun. (And be sure to fully be on board yourself before bringing it up to the clan.)

Decide how much time you think they’ll be willing to commit. Perhaps start with a single day (Thanksgiving Day?) and see how it goes. Or, if you’re feeling ambitious, look into weekly opportunities. It’s a great bonding opportunity—and a unique one at that.

Now, decide a few things as a family:

What are your goals? Getting to know about a new community? Making an impact in a specific place (such as a park or school)? Having fun as a family?

Different goals should impact where you choose to volunteer. For example, a family looking to have fun might work at a community theater or participate in a charity baking event.

What activities do your family enjoy doing together? Being outside? Sports? Reading? Board games? Movies?

A family that enjoys being outdoors could plant a vegetable garden in a low-income neighborhood. A family that likes sports could volunteer at a community center playing with kids. Look for activities that your entire family enjoys—it’ll feel less like work and more like giving back.

Consider checking out places that your family already frequents (a zoo, a library, community center, etc.). Younger kids will feel more comfortable being somewhere familiar. And, better yet, if they return they can see the results of their efforts later on.

What skills does your family have? Is your family bilingual? Do you enjoy cooking together? What other special skills do you all have in common?

If you speak another language you could work at a center for new immigrants or tutoring programs for students with language barriers. If your family likes to cook, consider preparing a meal at a soup kitchen.

Keep in mind that younger kids need simpler jobs. But that doesn’t mean they can’t get involved.

Be sure to select something that the entire family can do and looks forward to. Volunteering shouldn’t be stressful. It can teach kids valuable lessons and bond a family—it just takes a little planning to find the perfect fit.

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