Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Four Reasons to Participate in National Mentoring Month

The youth of today will be tomorrow’s leaders, educators and influencers. But before they get there they have a different role to fulfill—being kids. And as kids grow, it’s important for them to have influential adult figures in their life. With numerous problems that plague youth growing up, it’s more important than ever to help set an example.

A new year is the perfect time to start mentoring. January is National Mentoring Month, but that’s just a reason to start engaging in mentor activities. Here are four reasons to be a mentor, and to continue mentoring all year round. You’ll not only feel great about making a difference in somebody’s life, but you’ll hopefully create bonds with youth that will last a lifetime.

To Instill Good Values
Our nation’s youth are at an impressionable time in their lives. That’s why mentoring for any elementary to high school age student could make a bigger impact than what meets the eye. Even if you’ve only got a few hours a week to spare, small amounts of time can make a big difference. Give them a bright future by setting an example. Plus, you’ll learn a thing or two from them that you might not have expected.

To Stand Up to Bullying
According to Stopbullying.gov, most bullying occurs during or after school hours, which is typically the time that a mentor would be present. By taking up a block of time during that school day or after school, you’re discouraging bullying from happening to your mentee, or from your mentee participating. If any occasions arise to discuss the importance of putting an end to bullying, take the opportunity to address the situation.

As a mentor, be wary of the signs of bullying. If your mentee has any unexplainable injuries, sudden avoidance of social situations or other behaviors out of character, seek help. And even if your mentee hasn’t experienced bullying, make sure to educate them so they know what to do if a situation does arise.

To Encourage Lifelong Health and Wellness
Although it isn’t a problem with all of today’s youth, childhood obesity has become a growing trend in the United States. Help instill good exercise habits early in your mentee’s life so that they will continue to practice those habits later on in life.

Instead of always sitting down to chat with your mentee, get active. Play games, run around and let them be kids. Even if you aren’t a sports guru, let your mentee teach you some different games. Whether or not you follow the rules or end up making a fool or yourself, the important part is that your mentee learns to stay active.

To Discourage Bad Habits
Statistics don’t lie. And an impact study conducted by the Big Brothers Big Sisters foundation boasts some telling stats. Research showed that youth who spent time with a caring adult mentor regularly for at least one year were less likely than other youth to use illegal drugs or drink alcohol, as well as skipping school or class. Plus, the study revealed that students were generally more trusting of their parents or guardians.

  • Area Catholic choirs will perform Advent and Christmas songs of the season in the beautiful setting of St. Thomas Aquinas Church (the Newman Center) on the campus of UNL. Visit our calendar of event page for more information and to print out a ticket order form.

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