Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Mumbling With Bubbly—The Special Message of a New Year’s Song

Oh, it’s inevitable. On New Year’s Eve the countdown and smack of lips give way to a quiet, uncertain mumble. Your friends trail off. At the stroke of midnight your party hesitantly (if you’re like most) sings Auld Lang Syne. Neither the champagne nor the late hour is to blame.

Precious few know the words to this rarely heard song. And they certainly don’t know what it means. But Auld Lang Syne has a special altruistic message that informs our approach to philanthropy. Perhaps it will inspire your charitable endeavors in 2013 as well.

Burn(s) Notice
In 1788 Robert Burns wrote the Scotts poem Auld Lang Syne to the tune of a Scottish folk song. In English the first line means, loosely, “for the sake of old times.” Burns’ poem is an important reminder not to forsake old friendships. Beginning the New Year singing of our old friends would be a grand start to a year dedicated to outreach and personal connection.

Reach Out
Consider how much better you feel after a long talk with an old friend. You can offload your worries to one another, encourage each other and reminisce about past years you both miss.

Some people are more isolated than others—whether language barriers complicate meeting new people or because they are new in town. Open yourself up to them. You could be an important personal connection your new friend desperately needs. Just think—down the road you may sing Auld Lang Syne in honor of the friends you made in 2013.

Old New Friends
Language and relocation aren’t the only things that make people in your community feel lost or disconnected. The sick and the elderly are especially at risk for loneliness. Especially during the holidays, the quiet of the nursing home or hospital bed can be unbearable. So visit a nursing home regularly. Write a letter to your out-of-state grandparents. Visit family members who are sick, or become a hospital volunteer.

In Auld Lang Syne Burns writes, “Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief, when from thee I am gone; will not thy presence yield relief, to this sad Heart of mine.” We hope Burns’ lyrics inspire your New Year.

Resolve to take care of the people around you, so that you can banish grief and cheer sad hearts.

© 2018 St. Gianna Women's Homes

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