Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Why It’s Important to Know Where Your Clothing Donations Go

Do you really know where your clothing donations are going? If you’ve been using generic clothing donation bins in your neighborhood, you probably don’t. Several shady companies are putting up these bins under a pretense of charity, only to sell the donated clothing for a profit overseas. This problem, which first became a real issue in New York City, is now popping up across the country.

So the next time you clean out your closet and want to give a (charitable) second life to your clothing, follow these tips to ensure that your donation is going to a legitimate place:

- Don’t believe everything you read. Unfortunately, several of these dubious bins have misleading or outright false information posted on them. When in doubt, call the number posted and ask where your donations will be going. Several New Yorkers learned that they were tricked by for-profit organizations when they called to verify the bins’ legitimacy.

- Go with what you know. If you come across a marked bin for an organization you trust, it’s always going to be a safer bet than a generic “clothing donation” container.

- Take the clothing to the nonprofit’s actual location.>/b> While the bins make clothing donation a lot more convenient, it’s worth it to go out of your way if it means knowing that the clothing will get to the right people. Drive or walk that extra 10 minutes to take your things directly to the nonprofit.

- Always ask for more information. It’s important to look into the donation practices of all organizations. Even if you’re very familiar with a nonprofit, ask questions about how they distribute clothing to needy individuals. Do they sell them at a low cost? Do they give them away? What happens if they have more clothing than they can process? Do they ever ship excess clothing elsewhere? Finding these answers will help you make a decision about where your donations will have the greatest impact.

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