Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Everything You Need to Know About the Slow Food Movement

According to the Slow Food website, it is a “global, grassroots organization with more than 150,000 members and 2,000 food communities throughout 150+ countries.” The movement is promoted as an alternative to fast food, and is built on the belief that “the food we eat should taste good; that it should be produced in a clean way that does not harm the environment, animal welfare or our health; and that food producers should receive fair compensation for their work.”

The Slow Food Movement was founded in 1989 by Carlo Petrini. The native of the Piedmont region in Italy created the organization as a reaction to the opening of a McDonald’s in the historic Piazza di Spagna in Rome, as well as the poisonings and deaths that resulted from a wine producer’s choice to cut his wine with methanol to produce larger quantities of a cheaper product. Afraid that the unique regional flavors of Italy were in danger, he began promoting a lifestyle that preserved the important cultural heritage of food and the people who produce it.

Participating in the Slow Food Movement is a great way to become more connected to your community and the food you eat. Whether you go all in and totally adopt the lifestyle or simply incorporate some of the elements into the way you eat and think about food, these steps will help you get started:

- Buy whole ingredients and cook them yourself. Avoiding processed foods is great for your health, and taking the time to actually prepare your food is rewarding and can be a surprisingly relaxing activity.

- Grow some of your own food. If you’re lucky enough to have a spacious backyard, you can plant a big and luscious garden filled with delicious fruits and vegetables. But even if you live in a tiny studio apartment, you can still grow certain kinds of produce indoors or on a tiny windowsill. Nothing tastes quite as good as something that you’ve grown yourself.

- Shop locally. Visit farmer’s markets or seek out other growers in your area. It’s a great feeling to know the story behind what you’re eating, and you’ll be supporting the food producers in your community.

- Join a Slow Food group in your region. There are more than 100,000 Slow Food members all over the world, so it’s likely that you have a group near you. It’s a great way to meet more people who are passionate about preserving the quality of food and a chance to swap new ideas.

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