Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

The 5 Best Practices of an All-Star Volunteer

We appreciate all of our volunteers and we want you to have an enjoyable and rewarding experience as you volunteer for us or other organizations. We’ve found that the best volunteers follow these simple tips for volunteering nirvana.

Come prepared. For example, if you’re working a soup kitchen, don’t show up in nice business attire (wear clothes that are okay to get dirty—and remember, it’s for a good cause). Likewise if you’re planting a community garden, bring tools such as shovels and garden gloves. Don’t expect the nonprofit to provide all needed materials. Do some background research before showing up ill prepared.

Be on time. Assuming you signed up for a shift, your volunteer time is valuable to a nonprofit organization. Don’t waste any precious minutes because you “couldn’t find parking” or “were just running late.” Plan accordingly.

Even, dare we say it, get there early.

Get ready to serve. The whole purpose of your volunteering is to give back. Showing up with a persnickety attitude is no way to be a happy giver.

Come with a positive, adaptable attitude. Perhaps on that particular day, you’ll be asked to perform a job you didn’t sign up for. Accept it. Do it willingly. Make it easier on the organizers and show everyone what it means to be a great volunteer.

Be open to learning. Your duty might require some training. Don’t be insulted or offended. No matter your educational background, you probably don’t know everything there is to know. And chances are, your organizers will be more familiar with certain aspects of that nonprofit you’re volunteering for.

Be a patient student, ready and eager to learn what’s necessary to perform your job to the best of your ability.

Be happy. Studies show that people who volunteer are happier and less stressed. Consider your time volunteering as a valuable opportunity to de-stress from your other daily responsibilities.

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