Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Dark Night of the Earth

On March 31, we hope every home on your street goes dark. And wouldn’t it make your Saturday night out even more romantic if the restaurant served your dinner by candlelight? Plus your yard won’t think anything of it if you switch off the landscape lights for one measly little hour.

On an early spring evening in Sydney in 2006, Australians first answered World Wildlife Fund-Australia’s call for an hour without lights. Now it’s gone global.

WWF’s Earth Hour is a call for cities, business and individuals to switch off their lights for one hour at 8:30 p.m. local time the last Saturday in March. It’s a viral event—first dubbed “The Big Flick”—created to drum up support and awareness for lasting climate change action. The Saturday night blackout inspires people of every culture to become proactive about halting climate change.

Fundraising is an important part of effecting positive social change. But WWF’s Earth Hour is a great example of how working together and sacrificing a little convenience can make a difference without costing money.

Last year, over 5,000 cities and towns across the world switched off their lights to send a message about climate change. In fact, people’s enthusiasm for defending the planet by participating in Earth Hour has helped the event “Go Beyond the Hour.” Now Earth Hour is only the beginning. Consider turning your lights off on March 31 the first step in a lifelong commitment to sustainability.

As WWF points out, Earth Hour relies heavily on social media channels like blogging and Facebook to spread the word about this worldwide, world-changing event. Nonprofits and their supporters can spread good ideas with social media. And the more we share great ideas and activities such as Earth Hour, the better our world (and our climate).

Can you spare an hour of electricity this Saturday? In doing so you’ll participate in an international movement that’s found increasing success by raising awareness about climate change. One dark hour can make one big change—all you have to do is participate. Better still, recruit friends and family members to participate along with you.

Earth Hour is an event every person and every organization can get behind. WWF’s Earth Hour is your call to be proactive about stopping climate change. Will you answer it?

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