Welcome to St. Gianna Women's Homes

We assist women and their families fleeing domestic violence or who are being coerced into having an abortion. Each family is provided a safe and secure environment to deal with the trauma caused by the abuse, become self-sufficient and learn to develop healthy relationships in the future.

  • Who is St. Gianna?
    Who is St. Gianna?

    St. Gianna Beretta Molla was a modern-day physician and mother who sacrificed her life to save her unborn baby. In 1961, Gianna and her husband Pietro were expecting their fourth child. During her fourth pregnancy, Gianna developed a fibrous tumor on her uterus. Wanting to save the life of her unborn baby at all costs, she chose a more risky procedure, the removal of the fibroma. After the operation, complications continued throughout her pregnancy. Gianna was quite clear about her wishes, expressing to her family, “This time it will be a difficult delivery, and they may have to save one or the other -- I want them to save my baby.” On April 21, 1962, Good Friday of that year, Gianna went to the hospital, where her fourth child, Gianna Emanuela, was successfully delivered via Caesarean section. However, Gianna continued to have severe pain, and died of septic peritonitis one week after the birth. Gianna was beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24, 1994, and canonized as a saint on May 16, 2004. Her husband Pietro and their last child, Gianna, were present at the canonization ceremony. She is the patron saint of mothers and families.

Our Impact

  • Women Helped Last Year

    35

  • Children Helped Last Year

    44

  • Nights of Housing Last Year

    17992

  • Babies Saved From Abortion Since Opening

    34

Make a Difference in a Life During National Mentor Month

Everyone needs someone to look up to in his or her life. Without our friends, family and mentors, you probably wouldn’t be the same people that you are today. Think back to somebody that had a strong influence on your life. What qualities did they possess? Mentors can possess the qualities to help motivate you to achieve your dreams, offer advice when you don’t know what to do and even guide you through the ups and downs of life. Now it’s time to repay the favor. January is national mentoring month, and it’s your turn to be a leader and role model for someone, or even for your community.

Become a Role Model
When most people think of becoming a mentor, they picture one-on-one meetings with someone younger than them. While there is a great need for those types of mentoring programs, there are also other ways to become a mentor. If you want to get involved in a formal program such as Big Brothers Big Sisters or through your local YMCA, there are a number of organizations. But you don’t have to sign up as a mentor to become a role model. Take a leadership role on a community project. You can become a mentor without even realizing it just by setting a good example. Others will come to you if they need advice or help after you’ve established yourself in the community.

Support a Program
If you feel you don’t have time to be an effective mentor, there are other ways to help. Maybe your company can partner with a mentoring organization in some way that not only helps the organization but also furthers your company’s brand. Of course mentoring organizations—as with many nonprofits—could use financial support to further their mission, if you would want to make a contribution.

Reap the Benefits
According to The National Mentoring Partnership, there are many benefits to those involved in a mentor program. For example, youth involved in mentor programs have higher rates of attendance at school and better chances of going on to higher education. Mentoring can also enhance health by preventing substance abuse and negative activities, according to the organization. Finally, statistics show that mentoring helps youth develop relationships and gain trust and communication skills.

Don’t forget to make a point this month to thank someone who’s made a difference in your life.

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